TELEVISION

Operating a television

You may also want to turn it up (increase the volume because you can't hear), turn it down, and turn over (change to a different channel, e.g. from 1 to 3).
Note: You can also say switch on, switch off or switch over (but not switch it up /down).

Types of programmes.

    Here are some types of TV programmes:
  • Soap opera: a programme often on two or three times a week, which follows the lives of a group /community of people; the stories are often exciting, dramatic and hard to believe.
  • Quiz show or Game show: individuals, teams or families who answer questions or play different games against each other. The winner gets a prize, e.g. a car, a holiday, money.
  • Chat show: a programme where a presenter talks to famous people about their lives and careers; sometimes there is music as well.
  • Documentary: a film with factual information, often analysing a problem in society.
  • A series: a number of programmes about the same situation or the same characters in different situations. This may be a comedy series (the programmes are intended to be funny), or a drama series (the programmes are intended to be exciting, with interesting characters and situations).
  • Current affairs programme: a programme about a current social /political problem. "Current" means that it is happening now, at the present time.

TV in Great Britain.

At the moment there are five "terrestrial" channels (or stations) on TV (BBC 1, BBC 2, ITV, Channel 4, and Channel 5). If you pay extra, you can have a satellite dish and receive satellite TV; or pay to have cable TV - there are many channels available.

Talking about TV.

    Here are some useful words and phrases connected with television:
  • What's on TV tonight (what programmes are showing on TV tonight)?
  • What time's the film on (what time does it start)?
  • How long do the commercials last (the advertisements between programmes).
  • What's your favourite programme (the programme you like most/best).
  • Are they showing the game live (as it happens) or just recorded highlights (parts of the game after it has been played, e.g. later in the day/evening)?
  • How much is a TV licence (money you have to pay the government if you have a TV)?

The given text is a sample text and we recommend you to use it while getting ready with your own stories on the topic.

Television in Our Lives.

          Television is the result of technological advance and one of the numerous things that makes our lives easier and better. But there are two sides of the coin, so there are two polar opinions on this subject.
          The first one is that television is doing irreparable harm to us. Advocates of "doing without" always say that television hasn't been with us all the time, but we are already beginning to forget what the world was like without it. Before we admitted the one-eyed monster into our homes, we never found it difficult to occupy our spare time. For instance, we used to have hobbies, we used to entertain our friends and be entertained by them, and we used to go outside for our amusements to theatres, restaurants and sporting events. We even used to read books. But now all our free time is regulated by the "goggle box". We rush home or gulp down our meals to be in time for this or that programme. Little by little we are turning into the slaves of TV set and we are becoming utterly dependent on the two most primitive media of communication: pictures and the spoken word.
          And opponents of the first opinion think that television is a unifying force in the world and a splendid medium of communication. It's the cheapest source of information and entertainment. Nobody imposes television on you. If you don't like it, just don't buy a set - or switch it off, besides there is a considerable variety of programmes on TV and you can select what you want to see. If you boast that you don't watch TV, it's like boasting that you don't read books. Our world changes too quickly and we must be in the know of all the things that are happening around us. Television is the best way to do it.
          As to me I am not keen on television and it doesn't take a great part in my life because of the lack of spare time. Usually I spend at most half an hour in front of TV - just to watch the news. If I have a little free time I prefer to listen to music, to read a book or just to meet my friends, and if I want to watch a film I prefer to go to the cinema. Only when I'm dog-tired and when I don't want to move a hand, I jump on the sofa and stare at the TV set. And on these rare occasions I prefer to watch entertaining shows, the so called comic serial films, like "Alf'. Then from time to time I watch teenage films about life of my coevals with the same problems as mine or just documentary films about nature and animals' life.
          The problem of necessity of television is the same as the problem of what we need from the technological revolution. The latter can bring us many blessings that is why people are often bamboozed into believing that they need this and that technical innovation. But we ought to make a choice. Unless we make an intelligent choice of what we want, the disadvantages will outweigh the advantages. And as to me I am for television because in my opinion it's a perfect way to keep in step with our changing world.

THE PRESS

Key Words:
tabloids, broadsheets, circulation, features, weather forecast, editor, reporters /journalists, headlines.

Tabloids - бульварная газета (газета с короткими статьями и большим количеством иллюстраций);
broadsheets - cерьезная газета;
circulation - тираж;
features - очерк, статья о знаменитостях или важных политических событиях;
weather forecast - прогноз погоды;
editor - редактор;
reporters /journalists - репортеры /журналисты;
headlines - заголовки газетных статей.

Background.

In Britain, most newspapers are daily (they come out /are published every day); a few only come out on Sundays. Magazines are usually weekly (they come out every week) or monthly (published every month).

Some newspapers are tabloids (small in size) e.g. The Mirror, others are called broadsheets (larger in size) e.g. The Times. In general, the tabloids represent the popular press (short articles and lots of pictures) and the broadsheets represent the quality press (longer articles and more "serious"). The largest circulation (number of readers) is The Sun.

Contents.

Most British papers contain the following:
  • home news (news about Britain), foreign/international news (news about other countries), business news, sports news;
  • features (longer articles about special subjects, e.g. a famous person or a political issue);
  • radio and TV programmes;
  • weather forecast (tells you what the weather will be like);
  • reviews (when film, theatre and music critics write about new films, plays and records and give their opinion of them).

People.

  • Editor: the person in control of the daily production.
  • Reporters /journalists: people who report news and write articles, many journalists are freelance (they work for themselves and are not employed by the newspaper).

Headlines.

Certain words (usually very short) are often used in newspaper headlines. Here are some:
  • row (pronounced like 'cow') - an argument,
  • to quit - to leave a job,
  • bid (n, v) - an effort /a try /an attempt,
  • cut (v, n) - to reduce /make less,
  • to back - to support,
  • to hit - to affect badly,
  • talks - discussions,
  • key - very important.

It said in the paper that ...

When we refer to something in a newspaper we can use the verb say (NOT write), or the expression according to:
It says in The Times that they've found the missing girl.
According to The Guardian, the missing girl was found last night.

The given text is a sample text and we recommend you to use it while getting ready with your own stories on the topic.

The Media in the Life of Society.

          
          The mass media play an important role in our everyday life. In fact they are an essential part of modern society. Press, radio and TV keep people informed on the latest and most sensational events.
          Millions of copies of newspapers are printed in our country every day. All the most important questions of social, economic, scientific and cultural life, moral and ecological problems are published in the press and discussed on TV. Opinions clash, officials and political parties are subject to criticism whatever their position may be.
          Since the 1940s television has become the window on the world, in other words our eyes. As well as radio has always been our ears. TV has become part and parcel of our life. Nowadays we can't imagine our life without the so-called goggle box.
          I can use media in different ways. It depends on my mood. As to me I am not keen on television and it doesn't take a great part in my life because of the lack of spare time. Usually I spend at most half an hour in front of TV - just to watch the news. If I have a little free time I prefer to listen to music, to read a book or just to meet my friends, and if I want to watch a film I prefer to go to the cinema. Only when I'm dog-tired and when I don't want to move a hand, I jump on the sofa and stare at the TV set. And on these rare occasions I prefer to watch entertaining shows, the so called comic serial films, like "Alf'. Then from time to time I watch teenage films about life of my coevals with the same problems as mine or just documentary films about nature and animals' life.
          And as for magazines, I buy a lot of them and they are all different. Sometimes I like to read about pop-stars, music and the cinema in teen magazines. Other times I am interested in reading about changes in economic and political life of our country. One of my favourite magazines is "Geo" as sometimes I enjoy reading about different countries and nations because it's really interesting to know what the world is like around you.
          In my opinion, today's younger generation is better informed than ever. And we know so much because of the media. Newspapers, magazines and TV programmes for youth reflect the young people's hopes and wishes, their leisure and education, their attitudes and opinions. Of course, such programmes, magazines and newspapers mostly deal with leisure, especially music and cinema. But some of them also advise young people what college or job to chose and give them knowledge.
          So the conclusion is that the media are a unifying force in the world. They enclose all people on our planet, provide them with the latest information and serve as a source of entertainment



Рекомендации к теме

Цель теоретических материалов к теме 15 "The Media in the Life of Society"- дать Вам необходимые для общения на эту тему слова и выражения, а также познакомить Вас с особенностями средств массовой информации в Великобритании.

В скобках Вы найдете пояснения к некоторым словам и выражениям, они даются на английском языке с той целью, чтобы Вы привыкали пользоваться англо-английским (толковым) словарем. Это поможет Вам увеличить Ваш словарный запас и развить понимание.

Ключевые слова и выражения нужно выписать в тетрадь и выучить. А также полезно учить наизусть целые предложения, в которых встречаются новые для Вас грамматические конструкции или идиоматические обороты.

Текст "The Media in the Life of Society" поможет Вам лучше понять и запомнить специфические термины, связанные со средствами массовой информации.

Задания к теме 15 включают в себя упражнения как на знание ключевых слов и выражений, так и на развитие разговорных навыков, умение отвечать на вопросы и высказать свое мнение на данную тему.

Если у Вас есть такая возможность, то найдите английские газеты и просмотрите их, выберите несколько заметок и постарайтесь понять их смысл. Просмотрите местные газеты, издаваемые в Вашей стране и сравните их с теми газетами, которые описывались в теории к теме.